White People, Reach Out to Your Black Friends Right Now

Me in California this summer

This picture above, this is me: a white woman in America. And this post is to other white people in the country we all call home. Because, white people, we have a responsibility to our neighbors of color in this very moment, and we cannot let that responsibility fall away.

White people, I urge you to reach out to your black friends right now and ask them if they are doing OK. Ask them how you can support them. And then be ready to listen. REALLY LISTEN.

You might hear things that challenge you. That’s OK. You might hear things that make you uncomfortable. That’s OK. You might hear things that make you cry. That’s OK.

I just had a deep conversation with a dear friend who is black this morning, and she challenged me. She helped me understand context in a more profound way, and how her daily experience differs so drastically from mine. My privilege is real, and our conversation of love reflected it back to me. I could not hide from it. I needed to hear these things, because only then can I acknowledge how concrete racism still is in our country.

What we’re seeing in the news today—the riots and protests and calls for justice for George Floyd—this goes far beyond the justified anger against and fear of today’s police (some of whom support the calls for justice, too, and some of them are my friends).

This goes back generations.

And while we ALL need breaks from the news and the world and life, we cannot keep burying our heads in the sand if we want to come out of this a changed nation for the better. I believe we can unite as one again, but that will only start if we listen, truly listen.

White people, reach out to your black friends right now. They need to hear from us.

What Would You Do If Your Mother Was Killed and You Wound Up on the Streets?

 

Imagine this: you’re a teenager and living in a small, one-bedroom apartment with your mom. She works 16-hour days and barely makes enough money to eat. You live in a desert inferno and barely leave your boxed home.

Then, one day, you take your younger brother for ice-cream. When you return, you find your mother dead. With no one left to care for you, you wind up on the street, trying to protect your younger brother.

What would you do?

The Making of a Monster

This is the premise of “Stone from HELL: An Apollo Illusion Short Story,” which just released on Amazon for only $0.99 this week (or FREE for Kindle Unlimited subscribers).

Stone from HELL_cover JPG version

I’ve always been fascinated by the birth of a villain, and “Stone from HELL” is the backstory of the most notorious hacker from my futuristic debut novel, The Apollo Illusion. If you read “Stone from HELL,” you might find hints of yourself in its protagonist. The story is dark, gritty, edgy, but most of all, it’s scary.

Scary because more than anything, “Stone from HELL” is about society’s dark forces that turn the best of us into the demons we fear at night.

Of course, you could go on living in your happy-go-lucky bubble, where these things don’t happen to your or your family. But then you wouldn’t get the thrill of challenging your mind to wonder, “What if?” And you’d miss the subliminal messages and hidden commentary about certain issues today. Issues that might affect you without your knowledge.

“Stone from HELL” is Short and Cheap, So Why Not Grab It Now?

For less than $1, “Stone from HELL” is a short story (about 24 Kindle pages) that you can read in 30 or 40 minutes. Really, if you buy it, I guarantee you won’t be sorry–especially if you’ve already read The Apollo Illusion and are dying for more.

Buy “Stone from HELL” now for only $0.99, and find out what makes a monster …